VT (Re-blogged): EINSTEIN, EISENSTEIN… THE WIND, THE BEACH, AND THE THIRD MEANING

Text published at the website www.virtualpresenttour.com, as part of the project ‘Virtual Tour’ by Mireia c. Saladrigues.

Lots, lots, lots, looooots of wind…
Such a wind flow that makes Vincent’s work gorgeous, today!
If the Backdrop would had been again in Piazza San Marco, would the plastic made a whole round, like when a swing has been pushed too hard?
I decided to record exclusively this situation, at least for once.

But again… other (parallel) events happen. One man came and made a funny interpretation of the ‘Backdrop‘. He associated it with and The Walls Have Tongues (or Peace the Old-Fashioned Way) by Stacey Sacks… and thought of them as a single work, recalling him on the beach. He also thought of Albert Einstein when looking at Stacey’s big tongue crowned by wood chips.

… The mention to Einstein -along with the whole situation- made me think of Sergei Eiseinstein, his hieroglyphs and his theories of ‘Intellectual Montage’

Reading Stanley Brouwn (2015-2016)


Installation by Tao G. Vrhovec Sambolec
Book by Stanley Brouwn my steps 12.12.2005 – 1.1.2006, modified metronome, table.
Duration: 21 days

About the work:

The work entitled Reading Stanley Brouwn addresses the theme of everyday walking, measuring, archiving, reading and rhythmic temporality.

By way of reading the artistic book my steps 12.12.2005 – 1.1.2006, the project establishes a relationship with the opus of the conceptual artist Stanley Brouwn (Suriname/Netherlands), whose many works address the (im)measurability and materiality of the distances and their archivisation through the process of counting his own steps.

The present work questions the understanding of the written documentation-archive of everyday activity as something tied exclusively to the past, and through the process of re-enactment suggests a reading of the archive as an instruction. This gesture transposes the archive outside the passing of time, giving it rather a double temporal orientation — into the past and simultaneously into the future.

The project contains three elements — the book my steps 12.12.2005 – 1.1.2006 of the artist Stanley Brouwn, an action that I have undertook, and an installation which repositions the book and the action “in the now” as an unclear and elusive rhythmical instruction, suggestion, norm or support for movement, reflection or listening.

The book consists of twenty-one pages, each page having the date and the number of steps printed on it. I read this book so that in the period of twenty-one days (from 1.2.2016 – 21.2.2106), on each day I walked precisely the prescribed number of steps, simultaneously recording their rhythms. The installation consists of the book and a modified metronome which ticks in the recorded rhythms of my steps from that period.

Through the activity of inscribing the text into my own body, I inhabit Brouwn’s archive with my own presence. The measured-out walk makes concrete the printed number of steps by bringing them back into the everyday, from which they have originated. If Brouwn’s archive points to a walked distance and thus invites the reader to imagine this distance, of which the measuring unit is an unknown variable, Brouwn’s step, then my reading transposes this (un)defined distance into the dimension of time — into rhythm and duration.

The recorded time of the steps constitutes a new invisible digital archive of rhythms, whose variations echo my walked path, my intentions, as also my spatial and social bearings. And like Brouwn’s, this archive too is imperfect, abstract, directionless, ambiguous and open.

Credits:
Software and hardware development: Mr. Stock Interfaces
Software development: Slavko Glamočanin
Carpenter: Seamus Cater

Producers:
Norwegian Artistic Research Programme and Bergen Academy of Art and Design
Zavod SPLOH, Ljubljana
Zavod Projekt Atol, Ljubljana

Project supported by Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Slovenia and City of Ljubljana – MOL

Thanks to: Robocross – Berlin

Tao G. Vrhovec Sambolec’s work is part of the Research Pavilion‘s first exhibition You gotta say yes to another access, a Nordic collaboration and produced by Uniarts Helsinki. The exhibition is open May 11th – July 2nd 2017.

VT (Re-blogged): VIRTUAL (PRESENT) REALITY

Text published at the website www.virtualpresenttour.com, as part of the project ‘Virtual Tour’ by Mireia c. Saladrigues.
.

.

‘Virtual Tour’ by Mireia c. Saladrigues (Doctoral Department – Academy of Fine Arts – Uniarts Helsinki) is in show at the exhibition ‘You Gotta Say Yes to Another Access’ in the Research Pavilion from 10th of May to 2nd of July.

VT (Re-blogged): STARTING

Text published at the website www.virtualpresenttour.com, as part of the project ‘Virtual Tour’ by Mireia c. Saladrigues.  

Everything is more a less ready for the opening after the tremendously hectic and busy week. But Niran had quite a surprise this morning when she came back to the Pavilion. One part of her delicate installation, made of about 150 photographs and strings, had been moved. Cleaners may constantly face difficulties while doing their job. We all know of cases of cleaners that have swept artworks away. For example, in the Museion Museum in Bolzano, the installation ‘Where shall we go dancing tonight?’ by Sara Goldschmied and Eleonora Chiari ended up in the garbage. Here no one thought that the cleaning woman might need to plug the vacuum cleaner, so she used Niran’s socket…

  

‘Virtual Tour’ by Mireia c. Saladrigues (Doctoral Department – Academy of Fine Arts – Uniarts Helsinki) is in show at the exhibition ‘You Gotta Say Yes to Another Access’ in the Research Pavilion from 10th of May to 2nd of July.

You gotta say yes to another access

HenkSlager-JanKaila_blogiin

 

The current rhetoric of the Open Access project – as put down i.a. in the Berlin Declaration – seems to want to answer the mechanism of exclusion intrinsic to the academic system of publishing. In their article “The Political Nature of the Book” (2013) Janneke Adema and Gary Hall draw an interesting parallel with the way artists in the 1960s confronted the commodification-oriented gallery system by opposing it with a new form of experimentation – using the book as a democratic medium. Similarly, over the past decade the potential of digital publishing has been presented in the scholarly world as medium-specific possibilities to develop counter-institutional forms of dissemination. An overall academic optimism arose: open access would achieve the complete accessibility of research results and thus – in the spirit of the current state of the democracy – break down the boundaries between the academic community and the rest of society.

This optimism, however, was almost immediately framed by the rhetoric of the neoliberal agenda: research should constantly be measured by the yardstick of transparency, accountability, discoverability, usability and efficiency. The net result was the emergence of a culture of peer-reviewed journal articles. A form of publishing that neatly copied the quality control procedures and the preservation structures of the profit-driven academic publishing houses. A form of publishing also that ultimately tried to exclude any form of experimentation for the sake of maintaining the confidence of the academic community.

How should artistic research relate to this development? Should it be, in the spirit of this form of research, a critical, self-reflexive, processual, non-goal oriented way of thinking about dissemination? How can such a form of conceptual openness be peer-reviewed? Does artistic research perhaps need a recalibration or a revision of the assessment criteria (such as relevance, ground breaking, originality, ambition, risk, topicality, beyond the state of art, scientific approach, suitability of methods, feasibility, broader impact). And ultimately, does it have the ability to question the radicalism of Access anew?

Jan Kaila and Henk Slager

This text is a curators’ statement that will also be present in the Research Pavilion for visitors to read.

Word from Commissioner Anita Seppä

AnitaSeppä_01_2_3_620

Uniarts Helsinki’s Research Pavilion for artistic research opens its doors in Venice on 10 May, the same day as when the Venice Biennale opens. The Pavilion’s venue Sala del Camino, a beautiful ex-monastery located in the Island of Giudecca, is an ideal place for art exhibitions, as well as workshops, concerts, performances and artistic interventions. Just on the other side of the Canal lies Giardini, the heart of the Biennale, with its energetic art tourists and souvenir shoppers. The island of Giudecca that’s surrounding the Research Pavilion, on the other hand, has a very different atmosphere: it is characteristically domestic and quiet.

Two years ago, in this uniquely rich cultural environment we hosted the first Research Pavilion under the theme Experimentality. The Pavilion for 2017 builds off of that, but also presents a radically new concept. First of all, the Research Pavilion will be a distinctly shared project, a joint effort set up by the talented people from all the academies of Uniarts Helsinki: the Academy of Fine Arts, Sibelius Academy and Theatre Academy. As such, the Pavilion will extend its scope to cover not only fine arts, but also music, performing arts, dance and theatre.

Second, this year’s Research Pavilion has a strong Nordic presence. We have invited the central networks of artistic research in Sweden and Norway (altogether 22 arts institutions of higher education), and their representatives Ingrid Elam, Cecilie Broch Knudsen and Geir Strøm are members in our Scandinavian steering group. This group of experts serves as an advisory body in the project and will also contribute to future strategic planning. In this political climate, as new walls are built up on a daily basis to hinder free mobility and international cooperation around the globe, it feels especially important to intensify the cultural partnerships between our closest neighbours and other transnational networks.

During the summer of 2017, the Research Pavilion will host three art exhibitions, which also present new international forms of collaboration with the famed Academy of Fine Arts Vienna and Zurich University of the Arts. In addition, the tremendously interesting series of artistic research activities called Camino Events will bring over a hundred professionals and students from around the world to Venice as guests of Uniarts Helsinki.

The first exhibition in the Research Pavilion is You Gotta Say Yes to Another Access, which will give thirteen Nordic doctoral students the chance to work on this year’s theme of the Pavilion, the Utopia of Access. In July-August, Florian Dombois from Zurich University of the Arts will go to the lagoons of Venice on a boat with golden sails to collect material that he’ll use to build a wind tunnel in the Pavilion for his exhibition, Galleria del Vento. The final exhibition Hauntopia/what if features works by doctoral students from the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. They will study traces of “ghosts” of the past and their effects on both the present time and our utopias of the future.

The Research Pavilion will articulate to an international audience how contemporary artistic researchers and researchers in the arts process topical questions and utilize fresh methodologies with respect to the theme Utopia of Access.  During the summer of 2017 we’ll see how experts of fine arts, music, dance, theatre, performing arts and curating produce art, research and pop-up events in the Pavilion and the surrounding urban space. Without a doubt the outcome will surprise us, in one way or another, as is to be expected when it comes to utopias.