Listening Walks Conceptualised

 

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A morning walk along the coastline of island of Giudecca transforms to an exercise in listening. The overall soundscape consists of dripping of a fountain, rumbling of vaporettos passing by and chiming of church bells over the canal from the shore of Dorsoduro. The layered frontal sounds are easily detected from near, mid and far fields.

Moving away from a reflecting wall to the nearby bridge reveals another sonic experience. The sonic environment opens up to the total of  360 degrees. The frontal sounds are still there, but now they are accompanied by the flapping of the waves of the canal and igniting motorboats right behind the listener.

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These two encounters resonate with the theories and methodologies applied in sound studies. In a recent anthology edited by Christina Guillebaud it is discussed, how the notion of soundscape has been conceptualised and how it relates to the one of ambiance. The former has been understood to relate to visual analogy, two-dimensionality, maps and frontal perception. The concept of ambiance is characterised by such terms as multimodality, three-dimensionality and  immersion. The list here is by no means an exhaustive but a suggestive one. More profound analysis would require further questioning and contextualisation to history of the two disciplines mentioned.

Characterising the concepts of soundscape and ambiance leads us to think of hearing as a special sense compared to other senses. It helps us to further ponder not only the sensory environment, but also how we are relating to the world by listening to it aesthetically, politically and scientifically.

However, in underlining these specific skills and approaches we should avoid the pitfalls what Jonathan Sterne calls audiovisual litany, referring to generalisations on differences between audible and visual worlds. Perhaps even more important is that we should be more aware of not replacing audiovisual litany with multimodal litany. In doing so we would be sweeping the special requirements of act of listening and documenting the soundscapes under the rug.

 

Heikki Uimonen

 

Sources:

Guillebaud, Christina (ed.) 2017. Toward an Anthropology of Ambient Sound.

Sterne, Jonathan. 2003. The Audible Past. Cultural Origins of Sound Reproduction.

 

Photos:

Heikki Uimonen

Venetian Sonic Environments

SanMarcoAmbiance is defined as sensory space-time. This sensing and feeling of a place involves a specific mood expressed in the material presence of things and how the mood is embodied. The lived experience as well as the built environment of the place is making the approach both subjective and objective. Ambiance is articulated when social, spatial and physical meet.

Venetian sonic ambiances are constructed in diverse ways in how people relate to places – or how they think particular places are relating to their sound-making. Tourists are entering churches with certain solemnity avoiding extraneous sounds. The Venetian busker is adjusting the outdoor acoustics by moving himself closer to the wall in order to project the sound of his bowed instrument to echoing campo. Open-door rehearsal of Vivaldi in Chiesa San Vidal is attracting passersby for the night’s Vivaldi concert. On Piazza San Marco simultaneous live performances of Mozart’s and Strauss’ music are competing with easy-to-digest jazz in front of the restaurants thus adding up to the image of the city as easy-listening-mid-brow music haven with a past.

12 million tourists are walking yearly the thoroughfares the ”Bermuda-Shorts Triangle” formed by Piazza San Marco, Rialto Bridge and Galleria dell’ Accademia. According to random participatory observation, field notes and field recordings the narrow roads were sonically quite diverse with sounds sources recognisable from each other. Keynote sounds – defined as sounds heard frequently enough to form a background against which other sounds are perceived – are composed of chattering of people and their footsteps reflected by the stony surfaces on the narrow streets and campos. Contrary to common practice in shopping and tourist areas there are no outdoor loudspeakers to centripetally attract possible customers. Somewhat scarce background music from the bars, souvenir shops and mobile phone retail stores of Rio Terra Lista de Spagna are leaking to ears of the pedestrians mainly from radio and commercial music television programmes.

Part of Venice’s charm is the lack of motorised traffic in the streets, which might not after all paint the whole picture of city’s soundscape. Marine internal combustion engines and outdoor motors make the distinctive drone signifying the daily maintenance of the city: the sounds of the public and private transportation and the crunching gearboxes shaking and resonating the vaporettos’ hulls are accompanied by the banging and clinking of the green-coloured iron barges collecting waste. Some of them are labelled as ”Veritas” thus bringing yet another layer to city’s multifaceted ambiance.

 

Heikki Uimonen

Souces:
Davis, Robert C & Marvin, Garry R. 2004. Venice, the Tourist Maze. A Cultural Critique of the World’s Most Touristed City.
Thibaud, Jean-Paul 2001. A Sonic Paradigm of Urban Ambiances. Journal of Sonic Studies, vol 1, nr. 1.

Photo:
Meri Kytö

Ambient Encounters

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In his novel Canal Grande the writer Hannu Raittila describes Venice and its culture through the lens of the group of consultants arriving to the city. The cultural historian is overly enchanted by the city’s layered past and buildings, whereas the engineer with rational mindset and alleged Nordic mentality gets frustrated of the tiny espresso cups filled with way too strong coffee for his taste. The excursion is entering the city in dense fog and is forced to orienteer themselves by the ear and by touching the walls for keeping themselves not falling to canals.

Another angle is offered by urban researchers Davis & Marvin in their study on Venice as a tourist maze and the world’s most touristed city. A peculiar liberation and empowerment can be experienced, when one gets lost deliberately and goes off the beaten track in city’s narrow and winding streets. Sounds – or the lack of them – is definitely making the experience unique. For the contemporary visitor the blessed silence, quiet of the city, slow rhythms, sounds of water and diverse echoes can be tracked down to lack of motorised traffic in this surreal anti-modern world of ”dreamlike quality”, which some visitors might find unsettling.  In mid-1700 century  the unique soundscape was greeted with joy because of the lack of the rattling of coaches and trampling hooves; Victorians facing modernism and its transforming soundscape appreciated the gondolas gliding noiselessly by.

These ambient encounters and many more are discussed and analysed in Walking Sonic Commons  by introducing an open workshop on the Venetian sonic environment. Two-day documentation of sounds by the participants will be followed by an afternoon of editing the collected field work materials and uploading them to an open platform. During the discussion and presentations the acts of listening are contextualised to concept of sonic commons, archiving, accessibility and the researchers’ contribution to preserving cultural heritage.

Heikki Uimonen

Sources:

Raittila, Hannu 2001. Canal Grande

Davis, Robert C & Marvin, Garry R. 2004. Venice, the Tourist Maze. A Cultural Critique of the World’s Most Touristed City.

 

Photo: Meri Kytö

The atmosphere of Venice, sonic weather and virtual urban sonic acupuncture

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“Walk slowly, drift, listen”

Our cities are decaying. We either circulate as fast as possible through public spaces or we inhabit them in a consumerist way. The urban dweller feels little engagement with its environment. Besides, the normalization of what we could call “the headphone city” in which people is creating their own soundtrack for the urban space is contributing to new forms of urban detachment and isolation. The Virtual Urban Sonic Acupuncture App (vusaa) is an artistic invitation to listen to the city with different ears and to feel how a subtle sonic intervention can drive our attention to urban areas and hidden corners fostering a more conscious urban dwelling and social dialogue.

What is Urban Sonic Acupuncture?
We can define acupuncture as a local action by means of a pressure point on a key spot with the power to change the situation globally, beyond the local area in which the pressure point is applied. Sonic acupuncture relies in applying sonic pressure points on key spots affecting the global sonic situation. Urban Sonic Acupuncture parallels the practice of Urban and Public Space Acupuncture in the Aural architecture field. Aural architecture deals with spatial and cultural acoustics, it also assigns four basic functions of sound in space: social, navigational, aesthetic and musical spatiality. Artistic sonic acupuncture interventions are placed along this axis by starting a negotiation between artistic intentions and the local knowledge and practices.

vusaa creates a virtual urban sonic acupuncture intervention in the public space by sensing elements existing in the place the user is in. A generative system is set in motion generating a sonic acupuncture specific to the given conditions the user is at every moment by using the microphone to listen to the environment, the camera for luminance sensing, the clock, and the GPS data.

Besides the inspiration from the practice of Urban Acupuncture, vusaa refers to psychographic techniques that Guy Debord defined as “the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organized or not, on the emotions and behavior of individuals.” and to the soundwalk practice that Hildegard Westerkamp called to “… any excursion whose main purpose is listening to the environment. It is exposing our ears to every sound around us no matter where we are.”

 

Urban Sonic Acupuncture: Aural strategies for the city space

Blog author Josue Moreno’s event (16.6. at 11 am) will consist of a presentation in which the artist will introduce and illustrate the theoretical and artistic background of his current artistic research on Urban Sonic Acupuncture and an enhanced sound walk by means of virtual sonic acupuncture in the surroundings of the Research Pavilion in Venice using mobile devices.

If you are interested in participating in the event or in testing the app, please contact the author at this email address: josue.moreno.prieto [at] uniarts.fi
Please bring your own headphones to the event.

VT (Re-blogged): EINSTEIN, EISENSTEIN… THE WIND, THE BEACH, AND THE THIRD MEANING

Text published at the website www.virtualpresenttour.com, as part of the project ‘Virtual Tour’ by Mireia c. Saladrigues.

Lots, lots, lots, looooots of wind…
Such a wind flow that makes Vincent’s work gorgeous, today!
If the Backdrop would had been again in Piazza San Marco, would the plastic made a whole round, like when a swing has been pushed too hard?
I decided to record exclusively this situation, at least for once.

But again… other (parallel) events happen. One man came and made a funny interpretation of the ‘Backdrop‘. He associated it with and The Walls Have Tongues (or Peace the Old-Fashioned Way) by Stacey Sacks… and thought of them as a single work, recalling him on the beach. He also thought of Albert Einstein when looking at Stacey’s big tongue crowned by wood chips.

… The mention to Einstein -along with the whole situation- made me think of Sergei Eiseinstein, his hieroglyphs and his theories of ‘Intellectual Montage’

Accessing Performance continued

After two days of intensive work around the topic “Accessing Performance” and condensed exchanges around our respective projects within the Academy of Finland funded research project How to Do Things with Performance, a moment for rest and reflection is a much-needed opportunity to try understand what happened. Accessing performance after the fact is nearly always difficult, although we did our best to document the workshops, presentations, discussions and performances that took place on 17th and 18th May in the studio space next to the Research Pavilion.

The experience of doing everything twice, repeating the same basic structure of workshops, seminars and performances and screenings twice was perhaps the most exhausting and exciting part of these days. We were all four of us doing either two completely different things, or then the same thing in a new variation in our seminar presentations and performances or screenings. Sharing and exploring various writing exercises during the two morning workshops was the least spectacular, but in some sense the most inspiring part. The workshops were led by Hanna Järvinen and Pilvi Porkola on the first day, and by Tero Nauha and me (Annette Arlander) on the second.

The seminars in the afternoons were probably the most fruitful for the research at hand. Hearing each other’s papers and adding comments and questions was useful. My task was mainly to provide brief introductions to the topics, to How to do things with performance? on the first day and How to do things with documentation? on the second. When listening to my colleagues well prepared and thoughtful papers I feel I should have done much more on my part.

Hanna Järvinen experimented with the format of performance lecture or lecture performance in her two versions of From Document to Performance to Document to Performance to – What? She asked what is the significance of past performance and documentation in the present and what is the role of the absences and silences in allowing for epistemological inquiry about performance, documents, and re-performance? What happens when a performance about a performance about a performance is re-performed?

Tero Nauha, in his paper Superposition of performance? proposed to shift focus from the economic apparatus, the request for accessible knowledge that is economically viable, useful and productive, into fictioning, where performance thinks, already. In his second paper, Performance thinking Nauha regarded the level of indeterminacy and indifference of performance as a practice of thought. Rather than focusing on the accessibility in knowledge or the ‘standard’ of art his presentation inquired on non-standard postures taking place in performance.

Pilvi Porkola described in her paper The Library Essays – between different spaces her project in Maunula Library, where she explores how the performative turn can be understood in the context of public institutions; how institutions can be understood as experimental places; and what performance art can do in that context. In her second presentation Porkola presented the online publication ICE-HOLE and launched its latest issue.

The performances in the evenings, despite being polished performances, where moments of artistic experimentation, too. Translating and relocating a site-specific audio work is a challenging task, as is performing live with the same raw material in ever new variations, for instance adding freshly recorded local sounds. Pilvi Porkola recreated in Fragments of Library Essays some parts of the Library project, including the recorded audio play performed in English. Tero Nauha performed A thought of performance? using a pre-recorded text on vinyl record, mixed with live sound with a Theremin and voice, demonstrating the queer cloning of some gestures of thought. For my part I (Annette Arlander) showed for the first time a compilation for screening of Animal Years 1 (2003-2009) on the first nights and Animal Years 2 (2010-2014) on the second. Watching these together with others was an important experience, although I realize I am quite bored with the work after all these years.

That is one of the problematic dimensions of accessing performance through documentation. For the artist, the act compiling and showing old works can be illuminating and necessary, but it can be frustrating, too, since it is often much more exciting to create new work. Here combining documentation and live performance can be a solution; the work has some continuation but is nevertheless constantly evolving.

What are your thoughts on accessing performance now, Pilvi?

Well, when speaking of the question of open access I have been thinking about the library as an institution, as a kind of fulfilled utopia of open access. The library institution is changing; some libraries offer today much more than books: music studios, working rooms, customers’ workstations, space and equipment for workshops, a small stage and so on. If I think for example of Library 10, in the center of Helsinki, there are many events going on there all time, like advice for seniors, Finnish language cafes, discussions, talks and workshops organized by citizens. So, how to think this change in the context of knowledge production? I read this transformation as a good example of the performative turn.

As for artistic research, I think there are still many existing forms we can use for sharing the things we do and the thoughts we have. For example, I’m happy we launched ICE HOLE – Live Art Journal issue 6 (www.icehole.fi) here at the Research Pavilion. ICE HOLE is an online magazine based on videos and texts, published by Reality Research Center (an artist society based in Helsinki). Issue 6 is created in collaboration with our research group; it is focusing on the Kick off – seminar we organised last autumn. This special issue works as a kind of documentation of that event as well as a platform to share multiple perspectives and aspects on the question how to do things with performance.

 

 

VT (Re-blogged): VIRTUAL (PRESENT) REALITY

Text published at the website www.virtualpresenttour.com, as part of the project ‘Virtual Tour’ by Mireia c. Saladrigues.
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‘Virtual Tour’ by Mireia c. Saladrigues (Doctoral Department – Academy of Fine Arts – Uniarts Helsinki) is in show at the exhibition ‘You Gotta Say Yes to Another Access’ in the Research Pavilion from 10th of May to 2nd of July.